User: OsamaSMAmin

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This large pottery basin was decorated with a human face and dates back to the Akkadian period, 2350-2156 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This bulbous jar dates back to the early bronze age, 3150-2900 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum ,Iraq).
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This cutting tool had witnessed the beginning of agriculture. Ubaid period, 5th millennium BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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These tool were probably used for cutting and chopping. The Obsidian is a naturally occurring volcanic glass and is not local to Mesopotamia. It was most likely imported from modern Afghanistan. These tools were found at Tell Shemshara (modern Lake Dukan), Tell Basmosian, and Qurashina (modern Sulaimaniya Governorate, Iraq). Neolithic period, 8000-7000 BCE. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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These 2 bronze shaft-hole axes date back to the late 3rd millennium BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This is the oldest inscribed object among the museum's collections. The cuneiform inscriptions can be seen on the upper aspect of the peg. 3rd millennium BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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A horse bit with cheek pieces in the form of horses. From Lorestan, modern western Iran. Sassanid period, 224-651 CE. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This was found at the city of Nimrud (ancient Kalhu, Biblical Calah), modern Ninawa Governorate, Iraq. Neo-Assyrian era, 934-612 BCE. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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These clay tokens represent the first form of counting, before the invention of writing. They date back to the Neolithic period, 8000-7000 BCE and were found in Tapa Raza, south-east of modern Sulaimaniya Governorate, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This terracotta figurine represents a cow and dates back to the Ubaid period, 4th millennium BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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These bended pottery cones were probably used for votive purposes. Ubaid period, 4th millennium BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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The outer surface of this large, partially broken, pottery dish was painted in black geometric shapes and pelicans while the inner aspect (not shown) was painted with ibex figures. Uruk period, 3500-2800 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This shaft-hole axe dates back to the early dynastic period,2800-2350 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This piece of wall decoration (mosaic) was part of one of the walls of the white temple at Warka (Uruk) city. There are stone cones inlayed on a gypsum background. Uruk period, 3500-2800 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This mascot was made of white marble and represented the "goddesses of the eye." Jemdet Nasr period, circa 3000 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This foundation cone records the building of a temple at Girsu by Gudea, ruler of Lagash. From Girsu (modern Tell Telloh, Dhi-Qar Governorate, Iraq), Southern Mesopotamia, Iraq. Reign of Gudea, 2144-2124 BCE. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This foundation cone records the building of one of Nanna's temples at Ur. Neo-Sumerian period, Ur III, reign of Ur-Nammu, 2047-2030 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This necklace was found inside a grave which dates back to the old Babylonian period, 2000-1500 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This rotating device of a potter's wheel was made of stone and dates back to the old Babylonian period, 2000-1500 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This is a fragment of a pottery thurible which was found at Tell Basmosian (modern Lake Dukan, Sulaimaniya Governorate, Iraq). 2nd millennium BCE. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This pottery jar has a spindle-shaped Kassite-style contours and was found within the Kassite layers at the city of Ur. Kassite period, 1531-1155 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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A flat clay stamp with an image of its impression. This stamp dates back to the Halaf period, 5th millennium BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This piece was part of a Parthian coffin's cover. The depicted woman is Ishtar. Few centuries BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum).
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This is the upper part of a terracotta statue which depicts a musician who appears to play on two flute-like instruments. The Hellenistic period, 323-30 BCE. From Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This partially broken jar dates back to the Hellenistic period, 323-30 BCE. From Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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This pottery jar has 2 bronze handles and was found at Nzara area near Pangween village of modern Sulaimaniya Govrnorate, Iraq. The Hellenistic period, 323-30 BCE. (The Sulaimaniya Museum, Iraq).
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