User: OsamaSMAmin

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This rock relief was made on the cliff of mountain Mir Quli (or Meer Qoli), about 1600 meter above sea level. This mountain is a part of a larger mountain, Pira Magroon, which lies in modern Sulaimaniya governorate, Iraq. The relief has no inscriptions on it and therefore it is impossible to define who was this man nor the era he belonged to... [continue reading]
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This clay document tells us how Nabonidus (the last king of Babylon) built and reconstructed the temple of Sin, the moon God, at Ur. It also mentions a prayer for the king and Beslshazzar, his son. From Ur, neo-Babylonian era, 555-539 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq.(The British Museum, London).
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It includes three columns of cuneiform inscriptions which record the reconstruction and restoration of the temple of Shamash, the sun God, at Larsa by the last king of Babylon, Nabonidus. Probably from Larsa, neo-Babylonian era, 555-539 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The British Museum, London).
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The three columns of cuneiform inscriptions on this cylinder mention the building and reconstruction of various shrines, quays, gates, and processional boats by king Nebuchadnezzar II at Babylon for the Babylonian New Year Festival. From Babylon (modern Babel Governorate), neo-Babylonian era, 604-562 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The British Museum).
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This document records the king’s reconstructive work at the cities of Sippar, Ururk, Ur, Borsippa, Larsa, and Dilbat. It also commemorates the king’s work of repairing the temple of Ninkarrak (a form of the healing Goddess of Gula) at the city of Babylon. From Babylon (modern Babel Governorate), neo-Babylonian era, 604-562 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The British Museum, London).
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The temple of the sun God, Shamash, at Sippar reached a state of complete disrepair. The Gods conveyed a message to the king via omens that he has been given the approval to rebuild and repair the temple of Shamash. This document records how the king had successfully reconstructed the temple. From Sippar, neo-Babylonian era, 604-562 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The British Museum, London).
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This document records the king’s reconstructive work on the wall of the city of Babylon. From Babylon (modern Babel governorate), neo-Babylonian era, 625-605 BCE, Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The British Museum, London).
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This unfinished statue probably belonged to the Assyrian king Shalmaneser III. Basalt, from Assur (Qala't Sharqat), Mesopotamia, northern Iraq, reign of Shalmaneser III, 858-824 BCE. (Istanbul Archeological Museum/Ancient Orient Museum).
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