Ancient History News Archive April 2012

April 2012

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The Sasanians of Iran have long played a historical "second fiddle" to their Romano-Byzantine, Indian, and Chinese neighbors. The last of the ancient Persian dynasties and perhaps the most culturally sophisticated of all Persian polities, the Sasanians were a dynamic and commanding force in the world of Late Antiquity. In this interview, James Wiener of... [continue reading]
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Plumed Serpent Exhibition Review

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published on 27 April 2012
For those of you interested in all that which is "Mesoamerican," please check out the Los Angeles Times' recent review of "Children of the Plumed Serpent: The Legacy of Quetzalcoatl in Ancient Mexico." This exhibition is currently on show at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art until July 1, 2012 and showcases some of the rarest and finest works by ancient craftsmen... [continue reading]
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Ancient Peruvian Tombs & DNA

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published on 23 April 2012
MSNBC is reporting that ancient Peruvian tombs are revealing fascinating genetic and cultural secrets. Throughout the centuries, many Andean peoples in Peru buried their dead in vertical tombs called "chullpas." Researchers from the University of Warsaw have traced genomic sequences of dozens of individuals, buried in the chullpas, encountering some surprising discoveries... [continue reading]
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Ancient Bulgarian Vase

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published on 23 April 2012
Bulgarian journalists are reporting that an unusual erotic vase has been discovered in the city of Sozopol, which sits directly next to the Black Sea. Dating from the 6th or 7th century BCE, the vase appears to have been crafted in Greece and later traded to what is present-day Bulgaria sometime later. Please click here to read more from UPI.com.
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Hardcore History Podcast

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published on 23 April 2012
There's a really interesting history podcast produced by Dan Carlin, called Hardcore History. He looks at various subjects in history, including several ancient subjects (such as the fall of the Roman Republic), in a very accessible, interesting, and captivating way. Fans of history and podcasting should definitely have a look at his site. Thanks to Felicia Day for the news tip.
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Peruvian Priestess' Remains Uncovered

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published on 22 April 2012
Archaeologists working near the Peruvian city of Chiclayo have just uncovered the mysterious remains of a woman believed to be a priestess of the Sican or Lambayeque people. Dating from the thirteenth century CE, the remains might provide some much needed insight into the final centuries of the coastal Sican civilization. Please click here to read more about... [continue reading]
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AHE needs your help with map project

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published on 18 April 2012
We are looking for your help with our next big project, which is best described as "Google Maps of the Ancient World". It's a very exciting and massive project. We need help with research on ancient cities and their placement on the map, with date ranges of their existence. As with the rest of the site, we cover the world from the beginning of civilization... [continue reading]
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Ancient Egyptians in Australia

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published on 18 April 2012
The Queensland Museum, located in Brisbane, Australia, is the newest venue of Mummy: Secrets of the Tomb. This unprecedented exhibition will be shown in Queensland from April 19 until August 19, 2012. With a mix of diverse artifacts and 3D technological presentations, Mummy: Secrets of the Tomb promises to be an unusual and captivating take on the splendors... [continue reading]
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Statue of Ancient Female Gladiator?

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published on 18 April 2012
LiveScience is reporting that a statue displayed in the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe, in Hamburg, Germany, might be that of a female gladiator. Topless and of unknown origins, the statue is nearly 2.000 years old but in very good condition. Contrary to popular belief, female gladiators did exist in the Roman Empire although they were quite rare. Emperor Septimius... [continue reading]
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Scientists have used satellite images to locate previously-unkown human settlements in Syria. Harvard archeologist Jason Ur and MIT computer scientist Bjoern Menze have combined spy-satellite photos acquired during the 1960s with modern images of the Earth's surface, and thus have devised a new method of mapping patterns of human settlements at an unprecedented... [continue reading]
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Google Art Project

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published on 16 April 2012
If you're interested in ancient art, be sure to check out the Google Art Project. With access to high-resolution images of works of art from over forty museums from around the world, this is a fantastic free resource. Recently, the Google Art Project has been incorporating works of ancient African art and sculpture to their online library: allAfrica.com reports... [continue reading]
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Late Spring 2012 Exhibitions

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published on 15 April 2012
At the Ancient History Encyclopedia, we like providing you with the latest information pertaining to exhibitions of interest to the scholar and enthusiast alike. Here are some new exhibitions to make note of: Mummies of the World: The Exhibition makes its Florida debut at the Museum of Science & Industry (MOSI), in Tampa, Florida USA, on Friday, April... [continue reading]
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Ara Pacis Augustae: Visual Documentation

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published on 12 April 2012
The Ara Pacis Augustae (Altar of Augustan Peace), also called the "Ara Pacis," is a famous Roman monument housed in the Museo dell'Ara Pacis, in Rome, Italy. Built between 13-9 BCE, it is widely considered to be one of the most beautiful of all Roman monuments. Here, you can view high-resolution beautiful images and access 3-D models of what the Ara Pacis looked... [continue reading]
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2012 BC: Cornwall and the Sea

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published on 12 April 2012
We wanted to inform our contributors and visitors from the UK that an exciting exhibition has just opened at the National Maritime Museum Cornwall in Falmouth, UK.  2012 BC: Cornwall and the Sea in the Bronze Age is a special exhibition which traces Cornish mining, trading, and maritime exchange with Bronze Age Europe. Among the highlights are the lovely... [continue reading]
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Ruins Found on Welsh Island

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published on 12 April 2012
The BBC is reporting that a team of archaeologists have uncovered the ruins of several prehistoric structures on the remote Skmore Island off the coast of Pembrokeshire, Wales. Better known for its diverse flora and fauna, Skmore Island is now believed to have been inhabited around 5.000 years ago. Please click here to read the article in its entirety.
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Ancient Chinese Music

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published on 11 April 2012
The New York Times ran an article on the ancient Chinese ziqi today. The instrument is making something of a comeback in contemporary China and dates from the Waring States Period (c. 600 BCE). Please click here to learn more about its revival in relation to renewed interest in traditional Chinese culture.
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Archaeology Southwest

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published on 10 April 2012
At the Ancient History Encyclopedia, we like to introduce our users and contributors to other organizations and institutions which provide assistance in the study and preservation of the ancient past. One such organization is Archaeology Southwest. This is a private nonprofit which aims to increase public awareness in the rich past of the ancient cultures... [continue reading]
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Teachers or instructors might be interested in accessing images of the ancient world from the New York Public Library's Picture Collection. With over 1.700 images covering a range of subjects from ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, and other cultures around the Mediterranean, this is a great resource for the classroom. All the images were rendered or conceived... [continue reading]
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Religious Changes Caused Mayan Collapse?

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published on 06 April 2012
For several decades, scholars and archaeologists have debated what caused the decline and collapse of the Classical Maya (c. 250-900 CE). Most content that it was a combination of agricultural mismanagement and environmental changes, which doomed the city-states of the formidable Maya. MSNBC published this article last month, which suggested that changes... [continue reading]
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Understanding Rock Art

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published on 04 April 2012
Rock art is both ubiquitous and mysterious: it exists on every continent except Antarctica, yet remains largely enigmatic. With advances in neuroscience and with the aid of medical imaging technology, scholars are now beginning to unravel the mysterious of rock art design and purpose. What has been uncovered is likely to both shock and surprise you. Click... [continue reading]
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Ancient Suez Canals

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published on 04 April 2012
Many are unaware that it was possible to sail from the Mediterranean Sea to Red Sea before the completion of the Suez Canal in 1869 CE. Nile-to-Suez canals existed more than two thousand years ago, providing a steady flow of trade and traffic between East and West. In the March/April 2012 edition of Saudi Aramco World Magazine, John Cooper introduces us... [continue reading]
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Nomads & Networks: Video Review

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published on 03 April 2012
The Economist magazine has posted this video review of "Nomads & Networks: The Ancient Art and Culture of Kazakhstan" at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World in New York City. Please click here to access the video. We promise that you won't regret doing so! The objects are beautiful and most have never been seen by the public until now.
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Exciting News from China

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published on 03 April 2012
Channel News Asia is reporting that the remains of a Stone Age man has been unearthed off the southern Chinese coast in Fujian Province. Archaeologists from Taiwan believe that the 8.000 year old skeleton might be an ancestor to Taiwan's aboriginal peoples. The man was believed to be around thirty-five years of age around the time of his death and the bones... [continue reading]
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More Spring Exhibitions

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published on 02 April 2012
Here's a listing of more spring exhibitions which might of be of interest to many of you: The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), in Los Angeles, California USA, will be exhibiting Children of the Plumed Serpent: the Legacy of Quetzalcoatl in Ancient Mexico until July 1, 2012. With over 200 objects ranging from manuscripts and textiles to gilded plates... [continue reading]
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NYT Reviews "Byzantium & Islam"

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published on 01 April 2012
The New York Times has just reviewed the Metropolitan Museum of Art's newest exhibition, "Byzantium and Islam: An Age of Transition." Please click here to read the favorable review.

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