Ancient History News Archive March 2012

March 2012

Blog

SAFE (Saving Antiquities for Everyone)

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published on 31 March 2012
SAFE (Saving Antiquities for Everyone) is an organization dedicated to raising public awareness about the irreversible damage to the study of history and culture that results from looting, smuggling, and trading illicit antiques. Advocating cultural preservation and educational outreach, SAFE is on the vanguard of delineating the necessity of ethical practices... [continue reading]
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Follow AHE on LinkedIn!

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published on 30 March 2012
We just wanted to invite (and reiterate) to all of our contributors and users that we are on LinkedIn! Follow us and keep up to date with the latest news and events regarding our growing community. Also, please be sure to join or visit the Ancient History Group. Here you can network, read more articles, and interact with other ancient history enthusiasts... [continue reading]
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An Ancient Roman Celebrity

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published on 30 March 2012
The name "Lucius Septimius Flavianus Flavillianus," probably does not mean anything to you but it certainly did to the inhabitants of Oinoanda, a Roman city located in present-day southwest Turkey, around the year 200 CE. A recent translation from Greek reveals that he was something of a superstar in the world of sports; apparently, Flavillianus excelled... [continue reading]
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The Ancient Greeks in Spain

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published on 30 March 2012
The Greek Reporter has published an interesting article about the town of "Empúries" (in Catalan) or "Emporion" (in Ancient Greek). For those of you that know Spain well, please be aware that the town had also been called "Ampurias" (in Castilian Spanish) until recent times. Established by Greek fisherman, merchants, and settlers from Phocaea in c. 575... [continue reading]
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Ancient Thrace in the Heart of Europe

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published on 29 March 2012
If you should find yourself in Prague, Czech Republic, later this year, you might be interested in attending a planned exhibition on ancient Thrace. Although the details have been kept to a minimum, you can find more information by reading this article from the Prague Daily Monitor. When we have more details, we promise to pass them along to you.
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Quest for the Lost Maya Documentary

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published on 29 March 2012
We wanted to alert our readers and users in the United States about a very interesting documentary: "Quest for the Lost Maya." It aired on PBS last night (in most locations) and is available online as a streaming video. This documentary follows three archaeologists--George Bey, Bill Ringle, and Tomás Gallareta Negrón--exploring the remains of a forgotten... [continue reading]
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Tutankhamun Exhibition in Malmo

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published on 29 March 2012
For those of you who visit our site from Scandinavia, please be aware that the gilded treasures of Tutankhamen are heading your way this fall. From September 15, 2012 to January 1, 2013, the "Tutankhamun" exhibition will be on view at the Malmö Expo Center, in Malmö, Sweden. This international show has already delighted crowds in Oceania, Europe, Asia... [continue reading]
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Partying Like an Ancient Celt

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published on 26 March 2012
The ancient Celts were known for their fierce warriors, their druids, and their art. They were also quite fashionable--in some sense--and keen on parties. Science Daily recently featured an article on recent excavations in Germany, which have revealed the "partying" culture of the Pre-Roman Celts. To read more, please click here to access the article.
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Ancient Egyptian Women

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published on 26 March 2012
A British scholar, Barbara Watterson, has just written a book on the varied experiences of women in ancient Egypt: Women in Ancient Egypt, published by Amberley Press, traces the experiences of women from the very high (Nefertiti and Nefertari) to the very low (peasants and prostitutes). Along the way, Watterson peppers her work with little known facts and portraits... [continue reading]
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Catching Fish in Ancient Hawaii

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published on 25 March 2012
How did the ancient Hawaiians catch their fish? Better question: how many did they catch on average? Blessed with natural resources, it might be assumed that the ancient inhabitants of the Hawaiian islands would have over-fished the pristine waters of the Pacific Ocean. This article, recently published in the New York Times, challenges that assessment. Please click here to access and read it.
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Cahokia: Native American Metropolis

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published on 24 March 2012
While Teotihuacán, Tikal, Chaco Canyon, and Machu Picchu are the cities most commonly conjured in the minds of millions when the phrase "Pre-Columbian metropolis" is uttered, one ought to be aware of the grandeur and importance of Cahokia, located near the present-day city of St. Louis, MO in the Midwestern United States. Cahokia: Ancient America's Great... [continue reading]
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Tutankhamen From A New Perspective

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published on 23 March 2012
Maclean's of Canada has just published a review of a new book by Egyptologist Joyce Tyldesley--Tutankhamen: The search for an Egyptian King, traces the life and modern reception of this most ancient of celebrities. Looming larger in death than he ever did in life, Tyldesley's work attempts to analyze the boy-king from an entirely new perspective. Please click here to access the review.
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SnagFilms: An Excellent Resource

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published on 22 March 2012
The Ancient History Encyclopedia wishes to share resources which contribute to a better understanding and appreciation for the ancient world to user, visitor, and researcher alike. With that being said, we wanted to alert you to another great documentary film website where you can watch select titles for free. In the past, we informed you of the usefulness... [continue reading]
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UNESCO Courier Magazine

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published on 21 March 2012
We wanted to alert our readers and contributors to a phenomenal resource filled with unique articles and research from a variety of perspectives. UNESCO Courier Magazine is the bimonthly publication of UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization). By accessing the archive section, you can find articles and research on just... [continue reading]
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Archaeologists Return to Iraq

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published on 20 March 2012
USAToday is reporting that archaeologists are an increasingly common presence in Iraq. After nearly thirty years of war, rebellion, and governmental transition, archaeologists from the United States and Europe are returning to Iraq in droves. Now with new technologies and scientific advances at their disposal, archaeologists expect a great wave of new discoveries... [continue reading]
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Massive Mayan Metropolis

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published on 18 March 2012
For centuries, the forests of Guatemala have hidden an impressive Mayan city until recently: "El Mirador." In its day, it was the rival of the famous city of Tikal and one of the most powerful Mayan-city states in the Yucatan. Dating back more than 2.500 years, it is also one of the oldest Mayan cities ever found. Now, scholars and archaeologists are just beginning... [continue reading]
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Arles' Roman Secrets From The Rhone

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published on 16 March 2012
Le Musée d'Arles, in Arles, France, is the site of an unprecedented exhibition, exploring the submerged wonders of Roman antiquity from beneath the Rhône River. From March 9 to June 25, 2012, Le Musée d'Arles will bring Roman Arles ("Arelate") alive through the presentation of reconstructed models, artifacts, bronzes and silvers, and architectural pieces... [continue reading]
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Ancient Theatre of Delos

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published on 16 March 2012
While ancient sites around Greece have suffered because of the protracted economic crisis, ANSAmed reports that one major site has recently been given funds for restoration and protection. Yesterday, the Central Archaeological Council of Greece approved a measure to restore the famed theatre of ancient Delos. Built originally of marble and completed in... [continue reading]
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Google has just sent me an email to let me know that Ancient History Encyclopedia is now a featured education app in the Chrome Web Store! For all those Chrome users who haven't got our app yet, go ahead and install our app, to always have it easily accessible in your browser! And for those who aren't using Chrome yet... you should! ;-)
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Recording Ancient Australian Rock Art

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published on 15 March 2012
Australia has more than 100.000 rock art sites with more being discovered every year. Not surprisingly, Australia has the most rock art in the world. Academics and archaeologists face the daunting task of preserving and recording these ancient treasures--some of which date back more than 9.000 years! The Australian recently ran this article about a new initiative... [continue reading]
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Ancient Terracotta Figures in Japan

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published on 14 March 2012
Japanese archaeologists have uncovered more than six terracotta figures dating from c. 400 CE in city of Matsue in Chogoku region of Japan. The figures include warriors, sumo wrestlers, and finely crafted horses. The clay figures or "haniwa," in Japanese, were used for burial rites and as funerary pieces. This particular discovery has caused quite a stir... [continue reading]
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Remanum: Roman Empire Merchant Game Released

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published on 14 March 2012
The free-to-play browsergame Remanum has launched in English. In this massively multiplayer game the player takes the role of a Roman merchant who accumulates wealth and power, with the goal of becoming Roman Emperor. The game features a simulation of supply and demand in 20 historically important cities around the Mediterranean. Jan van der Crabben (the founder... [continue reading]
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The Mysterious Taino of the Caribbean

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published on 14 March 2012
The Taíno were the first people in the Americas to greet Christopher Columbus and yet, within only two generations, they all but disappeared from Hispaniola, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Cuba, and the Bahamas. Or did they? New evidence has emerged suggesting that the Taíno survived the Spanish conquest and maintained a sophisticated and self-sufficient... [continue reading]
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Were Incan Farmers the Best?

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published on 14 March 2012
Last Fall, Smithsonian Magazine featured this article on the Incan civilization of Pre-Columbian South America. Although the Incas inhabited one of the harshest and most unpredictable climes in the world, they proved to be not only masterful architects--their roads and cities still exist--but exceptionally adroit in matters pertaining to agriculture: complicated... [continue reading]
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Persian Splendor & Beauty

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published on 14 March 2012
Should you find yourself in Washington D.C., in the United States, be sure not to miss "Feast Your Eyes: A Taste for Luxury in Ancient Iran," at the Smithsonian's Freer-Sackler Museum of Asian Art. Exhibiting the wealth and splendor of ancient Persian metalworking from the Achaemenid period (550-330 BCE) to the Islamic conquests of the Iranian plateau (633-644... [continue reading]
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Ancient Rome in 3D: Rome Reborn

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published on 14 March 2012
Fancy a trip to Rome c. 320 CE? In 3D? Scientists and scholars from Rome Reborn enable you to just do that. Please click here to read an article from thestar.com about the project and be sure to check out the accompanying video. We promise that you won't regret it!
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The New York Times has published an article about recent discoveries on the cultures of ancient nomads in the Eurasian steppes. The recent findings show that nomadic societies were no less developed than their sedentary counterparts, and that they simply developed a different und no less successful strategy for survival. Also, there is an exhibition on this... [continue reading]
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Lecture on Anglo-Saxon Art

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published on 12 March 2012
The British Museum (London) is hosting the lecture Anglo-Saxon Art: Tradition and Transformation by Leslie Webster on Fri 20 Apr 2012 at 18:30. The lecture will trace this fascinating era of art and its recurring ideas and themes, as it changed from 5th-century metalwork to the magnificient illuminated manuscripts, ivories and sculpure of the 7th to 11th centuries... [continue reading]
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Ancient Road Uncovered in Greece

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published on 07 March 2012
An ancient Greek road has just been uncovered outside the city of Thessaloniki, in northeast Greece. Archaeologists and scholars date the marble road--"Via Egnatia"--from c. 300 BCE. Curiously, Roman tombs, containing jewels and tablets were also uncovered very close to the road. Please click here to read about this surprising "double discovery" from the South African Independent Online.
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Ancient Mayan Women: Power Players

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published on 07 March 2012
Shankari Patel, an anthropology graduate student at the University of California--Riverside, is causing quite a stir amongst her fellow Mayanists. In a recent, provocative paper, Patel claims to show that ancient Mayan women held multifaceted and important roles within Mayan civilization. Women, Patel contends, were not only wives and domestic workers, but... [continue reading]
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Traveling with the Apostles

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published on 07 March 2012
The feature article in National Geographic Magazine, this month, is on the travels and lives of the Christian Apostles. Written by Andrew Todhunter, the article takes you from the mountains of northern Italy  to the seaside ports of western India, imparting fresh perspectives on the ancient Mediterranean and early Christianity along the way. Please click here to read this  article.
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Looking for Rome's Aqua Traiana

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published on 02 March 2012
Archaeology Magazine just posted this link about Rome's lost Aqua Traiana aqueduct. Two filmmakers and two archeologists try to ascertain in this ancient Roman wonder was dissembled and reused elsewhere in the city. The results are surprising! Please click here to watch this brief video.
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The Secrets of Roman Jerusalem

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published on 01 March 2012
Last week, the Israeli daily Haaretz printed this article about the remains of Aelia Capitolina--the Roman city built directly on top of the ruins of Jerusalem after the destruction of the Second Jewish Temple in 70 CE. In order to uncover some surprising secrets, please click here to read the article.

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