Ancient History News Archive November 2011

November 2011

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Amasis: The Pharaoh With No Illusions

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published on 30 November 2011
Amasis: The Pharaoh With No Illusions Ray, John History Today ,Volume: 46 Issue: 3 (1996) Abstract There is no denying that ancient Egypt arouses great popular interest, but most of the interest concentrates on periods which have visual impact especially... [continue reading]
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A New Museum & Conservation Problems

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published on 30 November 2011
To our readers in the United States--specifically those of you in the Midwest--please be aware that a new museum is scheduled to open in Chicago, Illinois. The National Hellenic Museum is opening to the public on December 10, 2011, in Chicago's Greektown district. The new, four-story complex of 40,000 square feet will include several museum exhibitions on ancient... [continue reading]
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Ancient Rome and the Pirates

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published on 29 November 2011
Ancient Rome and the Pirates By Philip Souza History Today, Volume: 51 Issue: 7 (2001) Introduction: The Greek historian and geographer Strabo, writing around the time of the death of Augustus in AD14, divided the known world into two parts. The better... [continue reading]
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The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford opened six new galleries on Saturday that showcases its collection from Ancient Egypt and Nubia. Building on the success of the Museum’s extension, which opened in 2009, this second phase of major redevelopment redisplays... [continue reading]
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The Witches of Thessaly

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published on 28 November 2011
The Witches of Thessaly By Brian Clark Published Online Introduction: Book 6 of Pharsalia, Lucan’s epic account of the civil war between Pompey and Caesar, is set in Thessaly on the eve of the battle of Pharsalus in 48 BCE. Pharsalus is a major Thessalian city... [continue reading]
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Homer’s Humor: Laughter in The Iliad

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published on 28 November 2011
Homer’s Humor: Laughter in The Iliad By Robert H. Bell Humanitas, Vol. 20:1-2 (2007) Introduction: The very subject of humor in Homer’s Iliad might seem to be a bad joke. “Deep-browed Homer” has long been our laureate of loss... [continue reading]
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The beginnings of the written culture in Antiquity

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published on 28 November 2011
The beginnings of the written culture in Antiquity By M. Isabel Panosa Digit·HVM. Revista Digital d’Humanitats, No.6 (2004) Abstract: This paper proposes an analysis of writing as a system for communication, since its origins... [continue reading]
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Romulus, Remus and the Foundation of Rome

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published on 27 November 2011
Romulus, Remus and the Foundation of Rome By H Strassburger Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, Volume 34 (1987) Introduction: Besides Aeneas, there were always Romulus and Remus. The existence... [continue reading]
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Gods and Places in Etruscan Religion

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published on 27 November 2011
Gods and Places in Etruscan Religion By Ingrid Edlund-Berry, The University of Texas at Austin Etruscan Studies, Vol. 1 (1994) Introduction: Whether thou are a god or a goddess…(Cato, De Agricultura 139) As this epigraph and other quotes... [continue reading]
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On Kings and Nomads: New Documents in Ancient Bactrian Reveal Afghanistan’s Past By Nicholas Sims-Williams IIAS Newsletter, No.27 (2002) Introduction: Until very recently, Bactrian... [continue reading]
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A ritual bath exposed beneath the Western Wall of the Temple Mount in Jerusalem shows that the construction of that wall was not completed during King Herod’s lifetime. Professor Ronny Reich of the University of Haifa... [continue reading]
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Top 11 of 2011: Socrates Wish List!

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published on 25 November 2011
Eleven books that came out in 2011 that caught our eye! Alexander the Great By Philip Freeman In the first authoritative biography of Alexander the Great written for a general audience in a generation, classical scholar and historian Philip Freeman describes Alexander’s... [continue reading]
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Ancient Mayans come to Canada

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published on 24 November 2011
We wanted to let our readers and contributors in Canada know that a new Mayan exhibition has just opened at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. Maya: Secrets of their Ancient World will run until April 9, 2012 and travel thereafter to the Canadian Museum of Civilization, in Ottawa, from May 18, 2012 until October 28, 2012. This exhibition showcases recent archaeological... [continue reading]
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Roman Coins Discovered in Old Jerusalem

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published on 24 November 2011
Recently discovered Roman coins, found near the Wailing Wall in Old Jerusalem, cast doubt on the exact date of the completion of the second Jewish Temple. Did the infamous King Herod oversee the reconstruction of the Jewish Temple on the Temple Mount? Could it have been someone else? Please read this interesting piece from the Washington Post by clicking here.
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Aristotle and the Murder of Alexander

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published on 23 November 2011
Aristotle and the Murder of Alexander By Gilbert M. Cuthbertson Political Mythology, by Dr. Gilbert M. Cuthbertson (1995) Introduction: Lyndon H. LaRouche Jr. recently revived the charge that Aristotle was the poisoner of... [continue reading]
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Childhood in the Roman Empire

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published on 22 November 2011
Childhood in the Roman Empire By Ray Laurence History Today, Vol. 55:10 (2005) Introduction: Today, in the West at least, we find it hard to accept the unexplained death of a child. The terminology associated with these deaths, such as Sudden Infant... [continue reading]
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Using only a tooth, researchers at Idaho State University can help solve ancient archeological mysteries – for example, determining what someone ate hundreds of years ago on Easter Island or tracing the genetics of 2,000-year-old Roman commoners... [continue reading]
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Using only a tooth, researchers at Idaho State University can help solve ancient archeological mysteries – for example, determining what someone ate hundreds of years ago on Easter Island or tracing the genetics of 2,000-year-old Roman slaves –... [continue reading]
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State Counter-Terrorism in Ancient Rome: Toward a New Basis for the Diachronic Study of Terror By Ricardo Apostol Paper given at Re-Visioning Terrorism: An Interdisciplinary and International Conference... [continue reading]
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Other-Centred Love: Diotima’s lesson to Socrates

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published on 21 November 2011
Other-Centred Love: Diotima’s lesson to Socrates By Colin A. Redmond Master’s Thesis, University of Notre Dame Australia, 2010 Abstract: In this thesis I set out to determine the possible motivations in response to which Diotima... [continue reading]
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The concept of law and justice in ancient Egypt, with specific reference to “The tale of the eloquent peasant” By Nicolaas Johannes Van Blerk Master’s Thesis, University... [continue reading]
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Malaria and Alexander the Great: How important is family history? By Srdjan Denic Emirates Medical Journal, Vol.24:3 (2006) Abstract: Alexander the Great died from an acute febrile illness in 323 BC. Recent analyses have suggested... [continue reading]
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Sexuality and the Sacred in Gnostic Literature

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published on 20 November 2011
Sexuality and the Sacred in Gnostic Literature By Mary Sharpe Diploma in Theology and Religious Studies Dissertation, University of Cambridge, 2001 Introduction:  “Whoever finds the interpretation of these sayings will not experience death.”... [continue reading]
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Financial Intermediation in the Early Roman Empire

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published on 20 November 2011
Financial Intermediation in the Early Roman Empire By Peter Temin The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 64, No. 3 (2004) Abstract: In this paper I use a theoretical hierarchy of financial sources to evaluate the effectiveness of financial... [continue reading]
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Ophir: its location unveiled

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published on 20 November 2011
Ophir: its location unveiled By Emilio Spedicato Paper given at the 2010 Conference of Quantavolution Abstract: Ophir is the name of a geographic location appearing in several passages in the Bible. Most notably it appears as the far away place wherefrom... [continue reading]
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Egyptian Exhibition Opens in Virginia

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published on 20 November 2011
For our readers in the United States--specifically those of you located along the Mid-Atlantic--we wanted to inform you of an exciting, new exhibition, which just opened at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, Virginia. Mummy: Secrets of the Tomb features over a hundred objects, on lease, from the permanent collection of the British Museum. The exhibition... [continue reading]
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The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History officially opened yesterday its largest exhibition of ancient Egyptian mummies and artifacts in “Eternal Life in Ancient Egypt”. The opening follows a preview in the spring of three cases... [continue reading]
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Visigoths and Romans: Integration and Ethnicity

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published on 16 November 2011
Visigoths and Romans: Integration and Ethnicity By Jennifer Neal Honors BA Thesis, Pacific University, 2011 Introduction: Outside of Inginius’ fine home in Narbo, the January weather was far from pleasant. Inside the main apartments... [continue reading]
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A team of researchers led by the University of Colorado Boulder has discovered the first prehistoric bronze artifact made from a cast ever found in Alaska, a small, buckle-like object found in an ancient Eskimo dwelling and which likely originated... [continue reading]
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The Greeks were not always in such dire financial straits as today. But whether it is necessary to look as far back as these University of Bonn archaeologists did in order to see a huge, flourishing Greek commercial area? They have just discovered... [continue reading]
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In both Jewish and Christian traditions, Moses is considered the author of the Torah, the first five books of the Bible. Scholars have furnished evidence that multiple writers... [continue reading]
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Livia Drusilla: Deciphering Between Traditional Views of Rome’s First Lady By Meagan Button Honor BA Thesis, Western Oregon University, 2009 Introduction: On a warm August night in the year AD 14, Augustus... [continue reading]
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Festival of Egyptian Culture in Germany

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published on 14 November 2011
For our readers in Germany, please note that beginning on November 17, 2011, Frankfurt am Main will be hosting "A Festival of Egyptian Culture." In addition to various cultural lectures, concerts, and readings, there will be a life-size and detailed replica of the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun on display. This traveling replica has already been seen by over... [continue reading]
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Natural history in Herodotus’ “Histories”

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published on 14 November 2011
Natural history in Herodotus’ “Histories” By Valeria Viatcheslavova Sergueenkova PhD Dissertation, Harvard University, 2009 Abstract: This thesis argues that Herodotus should be considered in the context of early Greek science... [continue reading]
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The Topography of the First Dacian War of Trajan (A.D. 101-102): A New Approach By Coriolan Opreanu BHAUT – Bibliotheca Historica et Archaeologica Universitatis Timisiensis, Vol.2 (2000) ... [continue reading]
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The mighty and the sage. Scipio Aemilianus, Polybius and the quest for friendship in second century BC Rome By Michael Sommer Published Online Introduction: ‘Now that... [continue reading]
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Literature and Politics in the Time of Ramesses II: the Kadesh Inscriptions Ignatov, Sergei Literatur und Politik im pharaonischen und ptolemäischen Ägypten (1997) Egyptologists regard the Kadesh inscriptions... [continue reading]
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What Did Our Ancestors Eat?

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published on 13 November 2011
What Did Our Ancestors Eat? By Stanley M. Garn and William R. Leonard Nutrition Reviews, Vol.47:11 (1989) Abstract: Over the millennia various hominoids and hominids have subsisted on very different dietaries, depending on climate, hunting proficiency, food-processing... [continue reading]
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In Search of the Libyan Amazons: Preliminary Research in Tunisia By Marguerite Rigoglioso Societies of Peace: Matriarchies Past, Present and Future, edited by Heide Goettner-Abendroth (Inanna Publications, 2009) Introduction: When... [continue reading]
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The Jewish Revolt against Rome: History, Sources and Perspectives By Mladen Popovic The Jewish Revolt against Rome: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, ed. M. Popović; Supplements to the Journal for the Study of Judaism Vol.154... [continue reading]
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Research coordinated by Carlos III University in Madrid (UC3M) analyzes the images of women in Roman mosaics and their impact on the collective consciousness of feminine stereotypes. In many cases, the research concludes, the images pointed... [continue reading]
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Oldest Central European Paintings Discovered

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published on 09 November 2011
Tübigen, Germany -- Archaeologists have discovered four stone that have been painted by humans about 15,000 years ago. It is therefore the oldest known painting ever found in Central Europe. The meaning of the painting is unclear: The stones are covered with several rows of reddish-brown dots. Archaeologists speculate that they might have a shamaic meaning... [continue reading]
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Satellite imagery has uncovered new evidence of a lost civilisation of the Sahara in Libya’s south-western desert wastes that will help re-write the history of the country. The fall of Gaddafi has opened the way for archaeologists to explore... [continue reading]
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We're now on Google+!

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published on 08 November 2011
Today the social network Google+ launched pages for organizations and businesses, and we're among the first to set up our very own Ancient History Encyclopedia Google+ page! Add this page to your circles to get updates on AHE, to post suggestions, ask questions, or give feedback!
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Daily Archaeological News--AIA

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published on 07 November 2011
Every weekday, the latest archaeological news is posted by the Archaeological Institute of America. Although the range of articles and new stories is vast--everything from ancient Libya to sunken warships from the Second World War--many of them are sure to delight and interest you. Please click here to access the site and be sure to check often as it is continuously updated.
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Construction of the Top of the Egyptian Pyramids: An Experimental Test of a Levering Device By Robert Scott Hussey-Pailos Master’s Thesis, University of Florida, 2005 Abstract: A... [continue reading]
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An international team of paleoanthropologists and archaeologists from the Universities of Vienna, Oxford, Tübingen, the Senckenberg Research Institution (Frankfurt am Main) and other institutions, used Virtual Anthropology methodology to analyse... [continue reading]
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Humans may have undergone a gradual rather than an abrupt transition from fishing, hunting and gathering to farming, according to a new study of ancient pottery. Researchers at the University of York and the University of Bradford analysed... [continue reading]
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Rise and Fall of an Empire

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published on 01 November 2011
At long last, a scholarly book in English has been published exclusively on Sasanians of ancient Persia. Dr. Touraj Daryaee, the Howard C. Baskerville Professor in the History of Iran and the Persianate World and the Associate Director of the Dr. Samuel M. Jordan Center for Persian Studies and Culture at the University of California, Irvine, discusses his... [continue reading]

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